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TOPIC: Open Hearing Outcomes 2 & 3

Open Hearing Outcomes 2 & 3 1 year 11 months ago #115

  • Bill Brockbank
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Yes.
Both a very old appeal and the definitions establish the right of L to choose the proper course which suits them.
Proper course is what L would sail if W wasn't there.

To prove your case it helps if other boats in your class also sailed 30 degrees off rhumb, and you did so on prior laps.
Otherwise it might look like a try on or, more likely, an attempt to clear W's blanketing effect.
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Open Hearing Outcomes 2 & 3 1 year 11 months ago #114

  • Nick
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So in the rthird case, a proper course on a dead downwind leg for an asymmetric kite boat could easily be 30 (or so) degrees away from the mark. In this case the boat being overtaken would see this as a luff (especially if it is a boat that goes well close to dead downwind), but the overtaking assy would be able to explain this as a proper course?
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Open Hearing Outcomes 2 & 3 1 year 11 months ago #113

  • Bill Brockbank
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Open Hearings

There were 2 Open Hearings on Sunday
The first had 2 questions best treated separately.
Q. A boat is on my weather quarter, both of us are close hauled
Can I call for room to tack as we reach the layline for the next mark?
A. No. You can only call for room to tack at an obstruction, and the layline isn't one.

Q. In similar circumstances, can I call for room to tack approaching an island?
A. Yes, but only if you hail, and even then if you have no other seamanlike way out e.g. Tack, then tack back (what we used to call 'coffin corner') or tack then duck.
Comment: I think this is the one occasion when making the rules compact and succinct has gone a step too far. Allowing the call only when room is needed to 'tack and avoid' means it's not allowed if you could avoid.
This used to be much more explicit.
Another way to look at it is that it would be a nonsense if it applied between boats (say) 10 lengths apart.

The second is based on one boats testimony alone.
Q. When, and how far, can an overtaking leeward boat luff?
A. In some circumstances the rules constrain the leeward boat's course, not actually the luff.
If the leeward boat last established their overlap from behind and within 2 lengths of the windward boat they can't sail above a proper course, ie what they would sail if the other boat wasn't there.
In other circumstances (the leeward boat tacked or gybed into an overlap, or opened out beyond 2 lengths abeam before closing up again) the leeward boat can luff up to - but not beyond - head to wind if the windward boat, if responding fully and promptly, could keep clear.
A proper course can sometimes be above close hauled, e.g. the leeward boat is luffing to squeeze round a mark.
A proper course might be to go inshore (to cheat the tide)
When the chosen course isn't towards the mark, the leeward boat would have to satisfy a hearing their course was proper.
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